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Export Customs Procedures in Thailand

Goods exported from Thailand require complete reporting to Customs and are subject to customs controls. Due to the automated nature of the e-Customs system, the export procedures are very similar to the outlined steps for importing goods. The process and procedures for exporting goods from Thailand have been centralized into the online e-Customs system. In order to register for the system, the exporter must already possess a ‘digital certificate’. Once a digital certificate is in place, the exporter may proceed to register for the e-Customs system.

Two separate checks need to be made before goods are exported: firstly, to identify if goods require an export permit, and secondly, to ascertain if goods are considered ‘red line'(as opposed to green line). In terms of red line goods, extra documentation is required before the shipment can leave Thailand. These include Invoice; Export License (if required); other relevant documents (e.g. Food and Drug Administration approval, destination information, etc.). Green line goods are clear to proceed.

Exporting

Step 1 – Register to use e-Customs system

If companies are both importing and exporting goods from Thailand, only one registration on the e-Customs system is needed. See above for the registration process.

Step 2 – Review controlled goods

As with imports, checks need to be made for goods requiring an export permit and potential red line shipments.

Currently, around 50 goods categories require an export permit. These include goods such sugar and rice, which require a permit to maintain quality, and others including trees and seeds that require permits under other laws. The Customs Department website provides a detailed overview of restricted goods.

In terms of red line goods, extra documentation is required before the shipment can leave Thailand. The e-Customs system will flag red line goods at Step 3. The exporter should prepare the following:

  • Invoice
  • Export License (if required)
  • Other relevant documents (e.g. Food and Drug Administration approval, destination information, etc.)

Step 3 – Submission and verification of declaration

The exporter should submit an Export Declaration, along with an invoice and cargo data to the e-Customs system. Again, provided no errors exist, the system will issue declaration and payment numbers and define whether the shipment is green or red line.

Step 4 – Payment of duties and taxes

Not all goods require a duty to be paid. See the Integrated Tariff Database for the official list of duty-exempt goods.

Export duties can be paid by three methods: payment at Customs Department of port of exit; e-Payment via the e-Customs system; and payment at a bank.

Step 5 – Inspection and release of cargo

The freight forwarder should send a cargo control report to the e-Customs system, which will automatically generate a report and alert the customs officials if the goods are green or red line. Green line goods are clear to proceed. As with imports, red line goods require a physical inspection and extra document checks before they can be cleared.

Finally, once the shipment arrives, it is the responsibility of the shipping company or agent to submit the manifest information to the e-Customs system.

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